Family Reads: A List of Cages by Robin Roe

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Born out of a desire to get a family of book lovers to connect more over what they’re reading, Family Reads is an occasional feature where my mom, dad or sister and I read and discuss a book.

Why we chose Robin Roe’s A List of Cages

A List of Cages

Somehow, this book ended up on Dad’s to-be-read shelf. We picked it because it was readily available at the library and because we had previously talked about reading more YA together.

When Adam Blake lands the best elective ever in his senior year, serving as an aide to the school psychologist, he thinks he’s got it made. Sure, it means a lot of sitting around, which isn’t easy for a guy with ADHD, but he can’t complain, since he gets to spend the period texting all his friends. Then the doctor asks him to track down the troubled freshman who keeps dodging her, and Adam discovers that the boy is Julian—the foster brother he hasn’t seen in five years.

Adam is ecstatic to be reunited. At first, Julian seems like the boy he once knew. He’s still kindhearted. He still writes stories and loves picture books meant for little kids. But as they spend more time together, Adam realizes that Julian is keeping secrets, like where he hides during the middle of the day, and what’s really going on inside his house. Adam is determined to help him, but his involvement could cost both boys their lives…

Our Discussion

Vague spoilers about the conclusion ahead.

What we liked best about A List of Cages is Adam and his friends – a bunch of good eggs. They reminded me more of my high school experience than most YA books I’ve read. I asked Dad if it was strange reading about a modern high school. Was it much different from his experience? He said not really – particular the cafeteria scenes felt familiar.

Adam and Julian narrate the story in alternating first person sections. Unlike other books we’ve read that take this approach, we found the voice of each character was well-distinguished from the other.

Reading about Julian’s experience was certainly heartbreaking at times – especially when we considered that there are real kids who are experiencing abuse like he does. I choked up at the parts where Julian tries to justify Russell’s behaviour, showing he doesn’t know how he’s been manipulated. Roe does an excellent job at showing how kids can come to feel like they deserve what their experiencing, how they can get trapped in an abusive situation.

The ending felt a little abrupt – suddenly, the story became very dramatic. There were tense and painful moments throughout the story, but the conclusion has a lot of fast action.

Final Thoughts

Dad has only read a couple YA novels in general and I had never read a book about a child abused by their guardian, so A List of Cages was a new reading experience for both of us. I wouldn’t have elected to read this book on my own – the subject matter is too sad – but the positive characters and support from friends that Julian receives makes it a good read.  Have you read A List of Cages?  What do you think about reading YA that tackles such real and painful subjects?

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  • Dragonfly Our Familiarium

    funny I had many conversations with my dad about high school and he said the same! Things had not changed as much as I thought they had. I’m waiting for this book on my library! Can’t wait now after this review! 🙂

    • Isn’t it funny how that works?? I guess teens will be teens, never mind the decade! Thanks for stopping by 🙂

  • The Book Prophet

    I’ve heard some great things about this book! I love how you read books with your family 🙂