What Happened on Thursday

Millennium Library ArchitectureThis is a personal post about an awful incident I witnessed at my library a few days ago. You may wish to skip this one.  Writing it out has been helpful for me. I don’t usually talk about my personal life on the blog, and I debated whether I should share this. I’ve decided to post it because my library is such an important place to me, a safe place, a comfortable place, an almost sacred place. Discovering books, writing my blog, reading books, all these activities I do at the library are so closely tied into who I am. I have so much love for my beautiful library. I visit at least once a week. It was the place I missed most when I spent a year in Japan. I wrote a lot about it in 2014 for the Summer Library Reading Challenge.  My library is four stories tall and known for its impressive wall of windows and open staircase. You can see in the photos.

This is what happened: I was on the fourth floor. I saw a man fall from the fourth floor. I had been working on a book review at one of the public computers. Only later did I learn the man had become deeply upset by something he may have seen on the computer, just a few stations over from where I was working. I didn’t notice him until someone yelled, “What are you doing?” I saw a man clinging to the glass. So many people rushed to grab him – even I instinctively took a few steps towards him even though I was probably 50 feet away – but then I heard people scream and I closed my eyes and covered my ears.

I wrote out a long version of this story, with all the details of what I did and saw and felt in the moment. I don’t think that needs to be shared publicly. I’m glad I wrote it, though. Writing it out has been something of a purging process for me.

On Thursday I was shaky, unable to comprehend that what I had seen has really happened. The man was in critical condition. Maybe he would make it. I cried and cried on Friday, when I read that he had passed away. He was 25 years old, the same as me. On Saturday I settled down a bit. Every now and then I had a burst of selfish anger, like “Why did this happen?!” Today I feel pretty good. This helped. I’m not thinking about it non-stop. I didn’t know the man personally (how do his loved ones feel?), I didn’t see the worst moments (my heart breaks for those who did). Mostly I’m a little nervous about how I’ll feel when I go back to the library. I’ll have to remember that the library remains the the exact same place I know and love.

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Wrapping Up 2016, Looking Forward 2017

Welcome to my seventh annual ‘Wrapping Up, Looking Forward’ post. In this post, I like to take a general look back at how I did with my goals in 2016, and set some new goals for 2017.

I posted 62 times. This number falls just two short of my goal of 64. Although I didn’t follow the schedule I had dreamed of (8 posts/month, one review/week), I am satisfied with the posts I did write. I’m going to keep this goal – min. 8 posts/week, including one review or brief thoughts.

I read 114 books, smashing my goal of 84. My success can be largely credited to my participation in the Cybils as a round one judge for middle grade fiction. I believe this is the first time I’ve read 100+ books in a year. When I started 2016, I set my reading goal with the expectation that I would read very little during my four months of travel in New Zealand. I actually read 29 books while travelling. Most of the books I read were whatever my hosts happened to have lying around. Between travelling and Cybils, I had just four months to freely read and borrow from the library whatever I felt like. I am looking forward to taking charge of my reading choices in 2017. Hopefully I will make a better dent in my TBR list!

 

2016 Reading Challenge

2016 Reading Challenge
Jenna has
read 63 books toward
their goal of
84 books.
hide

I didn’t make my reading challenges a priority during the middle part of the year, when I had ample reading time and no other obligations. Thus my poor performance . I am less bitter about this than last year, though, as travelling Middle-Earth and participating in the Cybils were wonderful experiences that I was happy to prioritize over reading. I started to recap my challenges, but the numbers are so low, best to pretend I just didn’t have any. Instead let’s move right on to my personal challenges for 2017! 😀 I have three goals with specific numbers, but also a number of undefined goals (i.e. read more than in 2016).

  • 6 books by Indigenous Canadians
  • 4 books about Japanese spirituality
  • 5 books about/by J.R.R. Tolkien (not including re-reads)
  • Read more picture books and graphic novels (esp. ones people assume I’ve already read…)
  • Read more classic middle grade and speculative fiction middle grade
  • Read more non-fiction
  • Reread more!

This year, I also want to participate in some ‘official’ challenges. I don’t have any specific goals, but I hope these challenges will help me expand my reading horizons. Diversity Bingo originated on Twitter. Naz @ Read Diverse Books is hosting a reviewing diverse books challenge that complements the bingo. I found another bingo (apparently I like concept of bookish bingos) for Canadian literature, which feels especially appropriate given that it’s Canada’s 150th anniversary this year. This one is hosted in the Goodreads group Canadian Content.

Read Diverse 2017

2017 Canadian literature bingoDiversity Bingo 2017

That’s it for my 2017 goals! I may adopt additional challenges throughout the year. I haven’t yet planned to participate in any events, but I’m sure I will. Now that I have a couple years of book blogging under my belt, I don’t feel the need to plan out my year in much detail. I think I know enough to wing it 😛 How was your 2016 reading year? What goals or challenges are you undertaking in 2017?

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

I can’t believe I’m doing two posts in one day, but I couldn’t let this day pass by without comment! I’ve never been a huge Harry Potter fan, but as a lover of children’s literature and the reading community, I didn’t want to miss an opportunity to engage in lots of fun book excitement. My best friend (pictured below in the photo on the right) and I attended two Harry Potter events on Saturday night. He’s a proper Gryffindor. I don’t have any HP paraphernalia so I borrowed his Gryffindor scarf even though I’m pretty sure I’m Ravenclaw… The local independent bookstore had ambitious plans at a large park in the city. We checked it out for a couple hours, but with 12,000+ attendees we weren’t able to participate in any of the activities (I think had more fun catching Pokemon, haha). We certainly weren’t planning to wait in line to get the book at midnight so around 11:00PM we headed over to the bookstore where my sister works. She dressed as Luna for her store event. I read a few pages before going to bed, just to get an inkling of what the play was going to be about.  I finished reading it in the morning.

SPOILERS PAST THE PHOTOS!!

There were many twists and turns where I gasped and cackled. I had absolutely no expectations for the story so nearly everything that happened was a surprise for me. My sister asked me if the story was any good and I said I wasn’t sure. It was certainly entertaining, but was it a quality continuation of Harry Potter’s story? I’ll come back to that question in a moment. Part way through I finally predicted that Delphi would be Voldemort’s daughter and that’s where things started to fall apart for me. Voldemort having a child doesn’t jive for me. The plot felt improbable and a bit melodramatic. I found some emotion in the story (largely in interactions between the adult characters we know and love), and I would still like to see the play performed, but story wise I don’t feel like this adds a lot to the canon. It’s great to have a bit about what the characters are up to as adults. But the dramatic plot feels forced and a touch fanservice-y to me (especially with the alternate timelines). Overall, I had fun reading this just to see what would happen. I don’t think it’s adding a whole lot to the Harry Potter Canon, though.

Did you participate in any release festivities? Have/will you read Harry Potter and the Cursed Child? 

Wrapping Up 2015, Looking Forward 2016

Welcome to my sixth annual review of the year past and the year to come. I’ve now got one full year of book blogging under my belt, albeit a frequently disrupted year from moving and travelling. How did I fare in 2015?

I read 77 books, falling just shy of my GoodReads challenge (80 books). I participated in three year-long challenges, as well as three of my own personal challenges. (I sort of dropped out of the CBC Monthly Reads challenge back in June.) I also participated in three events – April and October Dewey’s 24 Hour Read-a-thon and Armchair BEA. My goal had been to also participate in a Literary Blog Hop, Non-fiction November, and A Month of Faves (December) but I hadn’t anticipated conflicts with my travels and coursework.

In my mid-year review, I adjusted my Japan books goal down to three and said I was on track for all the others. Shortly after uprooting myself from Japan, I fell off that track. Let’s review:

    • Re-read: 10/12. I didn’t manage more than 12, but it’s an improvement over 2014.
    • TBR Pile: 6/12. While I only completed six books, I did give four more serious efforts and found them not to my liking. Therefore, I cleared 10 books that long languished on my TBR, so I’ll consider that a success.
    • Foodies: 4/4. I made the short end of this goal, squeaking into the Pastry Chef category.
    • Indigenous authors: 3/5. I had two books sitting on my nightstand for weeks to make this goal (Three Day Road and The Revolution of Alice) but I didn’t make it happen.
    • Tolkien: 5/6. Close but no cigar! I didn’t read The Hobbit, On Fairy Stories, or The Road to Middle-Earth. And of course, I didn’t read The Silmarillion… Well, 83% is still okay. 😛
    • Japan: 3/3 – I read one book about Koya-san and two books at the Shikoku Henro. 
    • 8 posts/month: After moving back to Canada, I thought I would discount July and August, therefore aiming for 80 posts. Once again I lacked the ambition to see that through. As for bracket of posting twice a week (one review and one other), I didn’t get that balance, either. HOWEVER, I do think my writing style (in reviews, at least) has improved a smidge…maybe? 

    That’s the end of 2015. While writing this post, it sounds like I failed at a lot of the things I wanted to accomplish. I’m not feeling too down about it, though. I know I improved in various areas over 2014. I finally acknowledge to myself that I have a problem with completing things (from eating the last bite of supper to completing a goal to finishing a paper on time). This problem affects all areas of my life. I want to tackle it next year, and not just dismiss it as some weird form of nihilism, like I usually do (“What’s the point in making this goal? No one cares but me. It doesn’t really matter.”). I don’t want to find myself losing my good habits halfway through the year, unable to recover them again until the New Year provides a fresh start.

    I will be travelling in New Zealand and Australia from February to May. To be cautious, I will assume I don’t complete any reading during these months (my time will be largely preoccupied by WWOOFing and outdoor adventuring). After returning, I hope to find work teaching English while I apply for grad school. I’m not sure how work will affect my reading habits. I liked my goals from this year and I think they would have been easily manageable had I better spirits. Keeping all these factors in mind, here are my general blogging + reading plans for next year:

    • 64 posts (8/month when not travelling, twice a week, ideally one review and one other)
      • Improve writing style (be more precise, use less words)
      • Be more engaging (in posts and comments)
    • 55 books read, including…
      • 10 books reread
        • Not counting regulars (White is for Witching, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings)
      • 5 Japanese spirituality books
      • 6 Tolkien-related books
        • Not counting regulars (The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings)
      • 5 Canadian Indigenous books

    I am not actively planning to take part in any challenges (Foodies Read and TBR Pile Challenge will no longer be hosted by their creators) or events (sadly travels will interfere with the next 24 Hour Read-a-thon, a Tolkien Reading Event, and Armchair BEA) but I will participate as they catch my eye. Here’s to all the books read in 2015, and the gems to be found in 2016! Happy New Year. See you on the other side.

    Dishes from Quick and Easy Thai

    Back in May, I reviewed Nancie McDermott’s Quick and Easy Thai. Now that I’m back at home, I’ve made a few meals from this book using a new wok (how did I ever cook without one?!). Here are some snapshots of the recipes I’ve made. I usually forget to take pictures until I’ve already started to eat so some of them aren’t as nicely staged as they might have been 😛 

     Green curry chicken with zucchini (gaeng kio wahn gai): The first recipe I made in the wok, and also my first Thai curry from scratch. I followed the recipe pretty closely because of that. I found the curry thinner than I like, so after a bit of Googling I think next time I’ll try heating the coconut milk longer or straining a bit off. I used regular eggplant, but next time I want to try the Thai eggplants (green and golfball sized). Zucchini and eggplant make for a great green curry.
     Rice soup with chicken, cilantro, and crispy garlic (kao tome gai): McDermott knew just how to appeal to me when she described this recipe – “Simply delicious and simple to make, this is Thai-style comfort food. […] It’s the first choice when Thais cook for someone who’s under the weather, but I make it whenever we need a quick and hearty one-dish supper that satisfies us all.” I loved this soup. The cilantro adds a flavour I don’t usually have in my home cooking. My parents also like to mix in some Thai sweet chili sauce. I’m making this for lunch after I finish this post!
     Chicken with cashews and chilies (gai paht meht mamuang himapahn): I made this dish last weekend. I stopped by a Chinese market to pick up the chilies. I’d never been to one of the markets in Chinatown before (Chinatown being a very small part of my city), but I think I’ll be shopping there more often in the future! I love the spicy chilies. I don’t much like hot sauce (ex. Tabasco) but I love the flavour of spicy Thai food.

    All of these recipes were indeed quick and easy. The only time needed is the time it takes to cook the rice! The ingredients may be simple but they all pack that flavourful punch I love in Thai food. I realize now that I should maybe try some recipes without chicken… I would certainly recommend this cookbook for beginning Thai chefs.