Diversity Spotlight Thursday #1

Diversity Spotlight Thursday
Hosted by Aimal @ Bookshelves and Paperbacks

Finally, I’ve written a post Diversity Spotlight Thursday! The purpose of this meme is to share three diverse books: One you’ve read and enjoyed, one release that you haven’t yet read, and one that hasn’t yet been released. I actually enjoy reading this meme on other blogs. It’s a great way to promote diverse books and find new ones to add to the TBR. (I haven’t seen many posts about this lately so I’m not sure it’s a still a thing?? I like the idea anyway, haha.)

Read and Enjoyed: Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan

Amina's Voice

Amina has never been comfortable in the spotlight. She is happy just hanging out with her best friend, Soojin. Except now that she’s in middle school everything feels different. Soojin is suddenly hanging out with Emily, one of the “cool” girls in the class, and even talking about changing her name to something more “American.” Does Amina need to start changing too? Or hiding who she is to fit in? While Amina grapples with these questions, she is devastated when her local mosque is vandalized.

Goodreads | I’m also participating in the 2017 Diverse Reads Challenge, which has a theme for each month. I somehow mixed up April and May’s themes, which meant I read Amina’s Voice in April. (I had selected it to keep with May’s themes of ‘religious diversity’.)

I’m going to talk about this book from my personal perspective, a White girl who attended church as a kid. (I think this book would be a great read for Pakistani-American kids, but that’s not really my case to make.) Many of my friends also attended Sunday school. I didn’t know anyone who was particularly zealous about it. For most of us, it was just something we did. In Amina’s Voice, going to a mosque, participating in a religious community, etc. are everyday activities – ones that won’t seem so ‘foreign’ for church going kids.

Some of Amina’s problems come from those activities (she has to participate in a Qu’ran recitation competition but she has severe stage fright), but she worries about her friendships as much as you would except a middle grader to. The relationships Amina has with her friends and family felt very realistic. Her parents are positive figures in her life. In particular, I appreciated the missteps and assumptions she made about her friendships with Soojin and Emily. There is a lot for readers to connect with in this book, whether in the joys and trials Amina finds in her religion or in her relationships with friends and family.

The book that I should have read in April (mental health) but am going to read this month instead is…

Released but Not Yet Read: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

In the months after his father’s suicide, it’s been tough for 16-year-old Aaron Soto to find happiness again–but he’s still gunning for it. With the support of his girlfriend Genevieve and his overworked mom, he’s slowly remembering what that might feel like. But grief and the smile-shaped scar on his wrist prevent him from forgetting completely.

When Genevieve leaves for a couple of weeks, Aaron spends all his time hanging out with this new guy, Thomas. Aaron’s crew notices, and they’re not exactly thrilled. But Aaron can’t deny the happiness Thomas brings or how Thomas makes him feel safe from himself, despite the tensions their friendship is stirring with his girlfriend and friends. Since Aaron can’t stay away from Thomas or turn off his newfound feelings for him, he considers turning to the Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-alteration procedure to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he truly is.

Goodreads | More Happy Than NotTwitter brought Adam Silvera to my attention. I decided to give him a go for the Diverse Reads challenge, as I likely wouldn’t pick up his books otherwise (I’m not big on contemporary YA). I have heard a lot about his new release, History is All You Left Me, but MHTN’s premise appeals to me more. I always forget about that little scifi bit at the end – I’m definitely curious as to how it plays out.

Not Yet Released: the Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana

The Library of FatesNo one is entirely certain what brings the Emperor Sikander to Shalingar. Until now, the idyllic kingdom has been immune to his many violent conquests. To keep the visit friendly, Princess Amrita has offered herself as his bride, sacrificing everything—family, her childhood love, and her freedom—to save her people. But her offer isn’t enough.

The unthinkable happens, and Amrita finds herself a fugitive, utterly alone but for an oracle named Thala, who was kept by Sikander as a slave and managed to escape amid the chaos of a palace under siege. With nothing and no one else to turn to, Amrita and Thala are forced to rely on each other. But while Amrita feels responsible for her kingdom and sets out to warn her people, the newly free Thala has no such ties. She encourages Amrita to go on a quest to find the fabled Library of All Things, where it is possible for each of them to reverse their fates. To go back to before Sikander took everything from them.

Goodreads | That gorgeous cover and library reference in the title convinced me to add this to my TBR without even knowing what it is about. Look for it on July 18.

This post focuses all on 2017 releases. I hope to highlight more backlist diverse books in future posts. What books would you select for Diversity Spotlight Thursday? Leave a link in the comment if you’ve already written about it!
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5 Arctic Adventures from Icemen + The Luck of the Karluk

Icemen and The Luck of the Karluk

The Luck of the Karluk: Shipwrecked in the Arctic by L.D. Cross
★★★½ | GoodReads | Chapters | IndieBound | Wordery

Icemen: A History of the Arctic and Its Explorers by Mick Conefrey + Tim Jordan
★★★★ | GoodReads | No longer in print – check your library!

Icemen: A History of the Arctic and its Explorers is a great introduction to the topic of Arctic exploration. Originally published as a companion to a series on The History Channel, the book describes a number of incredible historical incidents in an intriguing and accessible manner. Ten chapters focus on either a particular explorer or expedition/historical incident, beginning with the lost Franklin expedition and concluding with the forced relocation of Inuit to the Arctic Circle. (I braced myself for a poor depiction of the Inuit, but Conefrey and Jordan have written respectfully about them, particularly in that final chapter.) The book could be used as a jumping off point for any number of topics you may wish to explore further. Icemen contains 29 black and white photos in the center of the book.  Published in 1998, this book is a wee bit dated but there are still many fascinating tales to be found within. Here are five events that I knew nothing about before reading this book:

1) Arctic Balloon Expedition of 1897 (Chap. 4)

Did you know three men attempted to reach the North Pole via hot air balloon in the late 19th century? This photo was recovered from film found in the Arctic nearly 40 years later. I found the tale of what happened on their journey the most fascinating of all the stories.

Eagle-crashed

2) WWII in the Arctic (Chap. 8)

Did you know that Spitsbergen, an island in the Norwegian Arctic, played a role in World War II as Germany sought to establish weather reporting stations? There was a lot more happening up there than I knew about (granted, my knowledge of WWII is pretty lacking…).

German WWII weather station
German WWII weather station in Spitsbergen. From Spistbergen-Svalbard.com

3) 5 Weeks Buried in Snow (Chap. 7)

Did you know a man can spend 5 weeks alone buried under snow in his tent, and emerge alright? That was one tiny piece of the chapter (pg. 128) on Gino Watkin’s Greenland explorations,  but it’s the one that made my eyebrows jump the most, haha. Here he is shortly after emerging:

August Courtauld

4) Peary and Cook Rivalry (Chap. 2 and 3)

I knew of their rivalry in passing (mostly because of Captain Bob Bartlett’s involvement in Peary’s journey), but I didn’t really know what the fuss was about. Now I do! Peary and Cook both claimed to have been the first to reach the North Pole, resulting in a bitter rivalry between the former shipmates. Today, both of their claims are widely doubted.

Cook and Peary postcard
1909 postcard (via NunatsiqaOnline.com)

5) Airship Crossing of the North Pole (Chap. 6)

Did you know an airship reached the North Pole (having spent 60 hours in flight above the Arctic on a previous outing), only to meet a disastrous end due to inclement weather on the way back? My eyes bulged as I read that part of the airship broke off on ice, depositing ten men, while six men remained trapped on the airship as it floated off again, never to be seen again.
Bundesarchiv Bild 102-05738, Stolp, Landung des Nordpol-Luftschiffes "Italia"

 

6) The Karluk Disaster (The Luck of the Karluk)

Karluk enOne of my favourite tales of an Arctic expedition that Icemen does not mention (presumably due to the fact that it did nothing for exploration) is that of the Karluk. A brief summary: The Karluk was part of a poorly planned expedition to the Arctic. The ship became trapped in ice early in ts journey. The expedition leader abandoned the ship, leaving Captain Bob Bartlett in charge. The men journeyed across the ice and eventually reached a desolate island. Bartlett left the island to get help. The remaining men were rescued just over a year from when the ship was initially trapped.

The Luck of the Karluk is part of the Amazing Stories series from Heritage House, which Heritage House describes as “shorter narratives designed for younger readers, new Canadians and casual readers” [source]). That makes the book a good introduction to the Karluk if you aren’t familiar with the story. I didn’t learn anything I didn’t already know, but it’s still a great story and this makes for an easier reread than Jennifer Niven’s The Ice Master! The narrative is pretty factual (and thus less ‘biased’ than Niven’s book) – which is fine, because the facts of what happened are pretty gripping – though some authorial interjections crop up to add moments of colour to the narrative. I recommend Niven’s book for a more detailed look at the personalities of and relationships between those on board. Bartlett’s first hand account is also a must-read if the tale catches your interest.

Had you heard of any of these stories?  Which event would you be interested in reading about? Would you ever like to visit the Arctic?

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April 2017 Month in Review

April 2017 in review banner

This post is linked up at the Monthly Round-Up Wrap-Up @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction.

Oof, how are we already a week into May?! The past few weeks have seen my energy diverted into apartment hunting. I have heard a lot about how hard it can be to find a place in Vancouver. Thankfully, I signed a lease yesterday! Now, I can put my time back into reading and blogging. I managed to skip ahead of my reading goal thanks to the 24 hour read-a-thon, during which I finished the final book in a trilogy, read three middle grade novels, an account of the 1913 Arctic disaster of the Karluk, and started two other books. I think it was my post productive read-a-thon 🙂

Books Finished

  • Sputnik’s Children by Terri Favro
  • Gutenberg’s Fingerprint by Merilyn Simonds
  • Music of the Ghosts by Vaddey Ratner
  • The Break by Kathrena Vermette
  • Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  • Ten Degrees of Reckoning by Hester Rumberg
  • From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsberg
  • Wednesdays in the Tower by Jessica Day George
  • Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan
  • A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab
  • The Luck of the Karluk by L.D. Cross

Books Reviewed

Features

  • My review of The Little White Horse was a part of Elizabeth Goudge Reading Day, hosted by Lory @ Emerald City Book Review.
  • I wrote about how my physical TBR stack was getting out of hand.
  • Dewey’s 24 Hour Read-a-thon took place on 29 April. It was my seventh time participating, to great success.

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Upcoming in May

The Seafarer's KissIt's Not LIke It's a Secret

How was your April? What May releases should I add to my TBR? 

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Dewey’s 24 Hour Read-a-thon Master Post (April 2017)

Closing Survey

  1. Which hour was most daunting for you?
    • Hour 8 – I had a short nap, which I thought would be good, but when I tried to go outside, I decided to go back to bed and slept for another hour and a half…
  2. Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a reader engaged for next year?
    • I did really well at choosing books suitable for a read-a-thon this year. I recommend Amina’s Voice or From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (both short yet enjoyable middle grade fiction).
  3. Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next season?
    • I wasn’t active much online this time around, so can’t comment on this.
  4. What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon?
    • See above.
  5. How many books did you read?
    • I finished one book, read four others in their entirety, and started two more. I finally did a read-a-thon like people have been saying to! (Choosing multiple short reads instead of a few long ones ^^;)
  6. What were the names of the books you read?
    • A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab – finished reading
    • Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan – entire book
    • The Luck of the Karluk by L.D. Cross – entire book
    • Wednesdays in the Tower by Jessica Day George – entire book
    • From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler – entire book
    • Icemen by Mick Conefrey and Tim Jordan – started
    • If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo – started
  7. Which book did you enjoy most?
    • I’m happy to report I enjoyed all the books I read. I don’t know if I can pick one the most! I had a lot of fun reading Wednesday in the Tower, because it had been so long since I read the first book and I enjoy the characters and setting.
  8. Which did you enjoy least?
    • Technically, I enjoyed The Luck of the Karluk the ‘least’, but I still found it to be a good read and introduction to the Karluk.
  9. How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again? 
    • I won’t be able to participate in the next read-a-thon (October 21) as I will be in Seattle for a Depeche Mode concert~

I read 924 pages in 8.25 hours. Although I didn’t meet my hours read goal, I definitely surpassed my time in the previous read-a-thon. For the first time ever, I read all the books I had picked specifically for the read-a-thon, and a little bit more! I allowed myself a lot of flexibility with regards to meals – I cooked up a Thai soup for my family for lunch and went out with my family for dinner. I had a lovely day, even if it wasn’t 100% read-a-thon focused. How was your Read-a-thon?

Somewhere in Hour 3

In a pleasant twist of expectations, I woke up well-rested shortly after 7:00AM. I finished A Conjuring of Light in bed. Then I got up to do my usual morning chores and eat breakfast. After breakfast, I read Amina’s Voice in one sitting, in my cozy reading spot. It has occurred to me this will be my last read-a-thon in that spot :O Now I’m taking a little break to complete the introductory survey and check out some mini-challenges.

  1. What fine part of the world are you reading from today?
    • Winnipeg, Canada. Primarily snuggled up in my bedroom.
  2. Which book in your stack are you most looking forward to?
    • I have a lot of good choices in my stack today, but I was most looking forward to Amina’s Voice which turned out to be just as good as I’ve heard.
  3. Which snack are you most looking forward to?
    • Rootbeer – it’s been ages since I’ve drank some.
  4. Tell us a little something about yourself!
    • Hm, what random fact can I throw out this time…I am in love with my diffuser from Saje. I don’t know if I buy into aromatherapy, but I can appreciate a pleasant scent while I’m reading 😛
  5. If you participated in the last read-a-thon, what’s one thing you’ll do different today? 
    • Last October I had already had a bunch of plans on read-a-thon day, so I didn’t get to read as much as I wanted to. Today I hope to read twice as much as last time.

Preparation

Good morning! Today is Dewey’s 24 Hour Read-a-thon. I can’t believe this is my seventh time participating. I will update this post a few times throughout the day, but I will be most active on Twitter. I have had a hectic week and I am looking forward to indulging in reading today. For the first time ever, I have curated a TBR that I think I could actually get through today). I focused on middle grade and short non-fiction.

  • Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan (197 pages, middle grade fiction) – My hold finally came in from the library a few days ago (just in time for read-a-thon!)
  • The Luck of the Karluk by L.D. Cross (137 pages, non-fiction) – I’ve read three books about the Karluk (two non-fiction, one fiction) and am hoping for a more objective perspective from this book published in 2015.
  • Wednesdays in the Tower by Jessica Day George (225 pages, middle grade fantasy) – I read Tuesdays at the Castle, the first book in this series, exactly two years ago during a previous read-a-thon. I think these books are a good choice for today.
  • From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg (162 pages, middle grade fiction) – A classic middle-grade that I’ve been meaning to read.
  • Icemen: A History of the Arctic and its Explorers by Mick Conefrey and Tim Jordan (180 pages, non-fiction) – I found this book while waiting for somebody at the library. I’m hoping it’ll brush up my overall knowledge of Arctic exploration (I only really know about the Franklin expedition and the last voyage of the Karluk). Not sure I’ll be in the mood for two Arctic books, though.

I still have a number of books from my TBR stack that I could also read. Perhaps I will finally finish A Conjuring of Light…My goal for today is 10 hours of reading. I think I’ve got enough to keep me interested!

On the snack front, I made an apple scone today and my mom also baked, so there are many treats to sustain me throughout Saturday! I have also done some prep to make a Thai soup for lunch. There’s a two litre of rootbeer open in the fridge, so that will be my ‘indulgence’ of the day.

I am sleeping in today, so who knows when I’ll start reading ^^; Are you participating in the Read-a-thon? Hope everyone has a great day! 

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Celebrating Elizabeth Goudge

Hosted by Lory @ Emerald City Book Review

Back in March, Lory announced she would once again be inviting readers Elizabeth Goudgeto celebrate the birthday of Elizabeth Goudge by reading one of her works and sharing their thoughts. I hadn’t heard of Goudge, so I ventured over to Wikipedia and learnt that one of the works she is most known for is called The Little White Horse, a children’s novel I would classify as a mix between historical and fantasy. Although this book won’t appeal to everyone due to its particular tone and simple plot, I found it a comforting read.

When orphaned young Maria Merryweather arrives at Moonacre Manor, she feels as if she’s entered Paradise. Her new guardian, her uncle Sir Benjamin, is kind and funny; the Manor itself feels like home right away; and every person and animal she meets is like an old friend. But there is something incredibly sad beneath all of this beauty and comfort—a tragedy that happened years ago, shadowing Moonacre Manor and the town around it—and Maria is determined to learn about it, change it, and give her own life story a happy ending. But what can one solitary girl do?

This book kept me grounded this week. I had just begun to take my apartment search to the next level by scheduling a few viewings. I had always known this would be the most stressful part of the ‘getting into grad school’ process. Starting the search made that really sink. The point being, I read The Little White Horse when my mind was all abuzz with concerns of practical adult life. Although I found it difficult at times to focus, this lovely little tale kept me grounded by being the just what I needed to put my head in the clouds. 😉

Despite the title, the ‘little white horse’ plays only a small role in the story. The conflict stems from historical family feuds, with Maria stepping into the role of the one who can finally set everything right. That story is simple enough and resolved relatively easily. What I enjoyed most about this book are the descriptions of the Kindgom of Moonacre. Maria finds herself in a wonderful world, tucked away in its own corner of England. I think many lovers of fantasy would be happy to trade places with Maria, to experience the decorated manor, homecooked meals, and beautiful woodlands would appreciate the scenes depicted in this book. Illustrations by C. Walter Hodges compliment the mood of the story. I particularly liked the map of Moonacre Manor.

Some aspects of the story feel dated. 10 year old me, accustomed to the middle grade fantasies of the nineties, probably wouldn’t have enjoyed this book.  There is some emphasis on God, and womanly duties (though Maria certainly isn’t constrained by them – I think she exemplifies how a character can be feminine and still a hero). The talk of marriage between Maria and Robin felt a bit out of place. But these things all gave the book a unique sort of charm, different from the sorts of contemporary fantasies I read today.

I’m glad I picked up this book. This is one of those little gems I wouldn’t have stumbled upon without book blogging. Goudge has a number of other novels, including more children’s. I wonder how her other works compare to this one… Have you read anything by Elizabeth Goudge? Check out Lory’s blog tomorrow (Friday) for a wrap-up of Goudge Reading Day posts. 

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