January Month in Review

January Month In Review

January has set a great precedent for my reading and blogging this year. I’m on track with my two general challenges: 100 books/year and 8 posts/month including 4 review posts. I have a lot of reading challenges, new releases, and scheduled blog posts to keep track of. So far I’m staying on top of my Word document that has all that information. We’ll see how long that lasts 😉

Books Finished

  • You Will Not Have My Hate by Antoine Leiris
  • Beast by Brie Spangler
  • Better Now: Six Big Ideas to Improve Healthcare for All Canadians by Dr. Danielle Martin
  • Before the Fall by Noah Hawley
  • Beowulf by Anonymous
  • Black Berry, Sweet Juice: On being black and white in Canada by Lawrence Hill
  • The Girl Who Beat ISIS: My Story by Farida Khalaf
  • The Wizard’s Dog by Eric Kahn Gale

Books Reviewed

Words and Pictures

This is a new segment I’m starting in 2017. I want to read more picture books, comics, manga, graphic novels, even though I don’t count them towards any of my reading goals. I’ve decided to do little summary of what I’ve read each month.

Ghost World

  • Ghost World by Daniel Clowes – I heard a lot about this book during university. I’ve finally read it! I suppose I can see what the fuss would have been about when this was originally published. It has a very particular style and mood.
  • Murder Mysteries by P. Craig Russell (adapted from a Neil Gaiman story) – The way this is presented is a little misleading. I thought it was Murder Mysteriesan original comic written by Gaiman. I eventually figure out it was written and illustrated by another guy (who has worked with Gaiman in the past). I liked the story (though I did find it a little predictable – side effect of reading took much Gaiman?). However, I don’t think the graphic novel form added anything to it. Not a fan of Russell’s art.
  • When We Were Alone by David A. Robertson – AWhen We Were Alone newly released picture book from a local author, When We Were Alone makes an excellent introduction to residential schools for very young readers, as it focuses on survivance. I attended the book’s launch at a local bookstore (see tweet below). Robertson’s daughter and Elder Betty Ross, a residential school survivor, read the story together. Very moving.
  • I Am Not a NumberI Am Not a Number by Jenny Kay Dupuis – Another picture books about residential schools, though for an older audience. Still an excellent resource! I liked that Dupuis writes about her grandmother and includes historical information after the story.

Features

  • The Cybils 2016 shortlists were announced on January 1st. Here are my thoughts on the books in middle-grade fiction (the category for which I was a panelist).
  • My annual ‘Wrapping Up, Looking Forward‘ post summarizes the year just concluded and outlines goals for the year forthcoming.
  • I wrote about a tragic incident I witnessed at my favourite library.
  • The Top 10 Tuesday I participated in in January features 2016 Releases I Didn’t Get To.
  • I signed up for two more reading challenges (Diverse Reads 2017 and the Newbery Challenge).

Shared on Twitter

Upcoming in February

  • 9 Feb – Publication of The Good People by Hannah Kent (sophomore novel by Burial Rites author. Looks like some stunning book design!)
  • 14 Feb – Cybils winners announced :O
  • 21 Feb – Publication of A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab (conclusion to the Shades of Magic trilogy)
  • 28 Feb – Publication of The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (inspired by Black Lives Matter)

How was the start of your 2017? What are you looking forward to in February?

This post is linked up at the Monthly Wrap-Up Round Up @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction.

Jenna's signature

  • Happy February!

  • I’ll admit that I was ignorant about residential schools (at least I didn’t recognize them by name), so you taught me something today. 🙂

    • I’m glad to hear that! Here in Canada, we are striving to implement more education about residential schools.

  • Danielle Hammelef

    I loved Paper Wishes and The Last Cherry Blossom. I’m always seeking to read stories set in other cultures.